---------- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.02
  
       Title: Is It a Fruit or Is It A Vegetable Common Sense Version.
  Categories: Fruit, Vegetable, Quiz, Test
       Yield: 1 servings
  
            Apple, artichoke, asparagus,
            Avocado, string bean, beet,
            Broccoli,
            Brussels spourts, cabbage,
            Carrot, cauliflower, celery,
            Corn, cucumber,
            Eggplant, grape, lettuce,
            Onion, parsnip, pea, peach,
            Pear, pepper,
            Plum, potato, radish,
            Raspberry, squash, tomato,
            Watermelon
  
   In the name of sportsmanship, let’s consider one more way to look at fruits
   and vegetables.  “According to L.H. Bailey, a vegetable is in horticultural
   usage, an edible herbaceous plant or part thereof that is commonly used for
   culinary purposes.  In common usage, the fruits of the tomato, cucumber,
   squash, etc., are considered as vegetables, grown with other vegetables in
   the home garden, although of course each one is a seed bearing organ and
   hence, under strict usage of the language, might be considered a fruit.” It
   is also as popularaly understodd, any plant cultivated for its edible
   parts.  This loose definition includes roots (beet and carrot), tubers
   (potato), stems (celery), leaves (lettuce), flower buds and heads
   (cauliflower), fruits (tomato), and seeds (peas, beans, corn).
   
   Looking back to the list, we can easily slip into familiar habits:
   artichoke, asparagus, avocado, bean, beet, broccoli, brussels sprouts,
   cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celery, corn, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce,
   onion, parsnip, pea, pepper, potato, radish, squash, and tomato are
   vegetables, all the others are fruits.
   
   In other words, if you call it a vegetable, and your neighbour calls it a
   vegetable, and your local grocer calls it a vegetable, then it must be a
   vegetable.  You like the sound of this?  Fine with us.  And, deep in our
   hearts, we suspect that’s the best way to play, according to Hoyle.
   
   Origin: The Old Farmer’s Almanac, Canadian Edition, 1996. Shared by: Sharon
   Stevens, Nov/95.
   Submitted By COOK4U@VIVANET.COM  On   WED, 29 NOV 1995 114258 GMT
  
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