*  Exported from  MasterCook  *
 
                   ABOUT BAGELS -- GENERAL DIRECTIONS 3 A
 
 Recipe By     : 
 Serving Size  : 1    Preparation Time :0:00
 Categories    : Breads
 
   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
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                         Text
 
   STEP 2: SHAPE BAGELS
   
   Prepare baking sheets by lightly greasing them with
   nonstick vegetable spray, or oil with a little
   vegetable oil spread with your fingertips or waxed
   paper.
   
   Reach into the bread machine pan and pull dough out
   (if it is slightly sticky, dip your fingers into flour
   first.) Some machines punch dough down automatically
   at the end of the rise cycle, and just the act of
   removing the dough from the pan is usually adequate to
   remove gases, but you may need to punch dough down to
   remove any remaining air. Or, remove dough from bowl
   or food processor bowl and punch down.
   
   Knead dough once or twice and let it rest for 5
   minutes. If the dough is still a little too wet and
   sticky, lightly flour the bread board or your hands
   and knead the dough manually, until it has a smooth,
   elastic consistency. Bagel dough should be stiff but
   elastic; if it’s too stiff, sprinkle a little water on
   it or moisten your hands and knead the moisture into
   dough. After you've made one or two batches of bagels,
   you'll get the feeling of the ideal consistency.
   
   Roll and pull dough into a rectangle about 10x14 for
   a 1-pound recipe and 14x18 for a 1 1/2-pound recipe,
   and let it rest for 5 minutes. Sprinkle with dried
   fruits, nuts, vegetables, seeds, spices, chocolate, or
   any combination of flavorings. Roll dough into a log
   and knead the ingredients into the dough for a minute
   or so.
   
   The dough should weigh a little more than the size
   recipe you are using. Divide dough into pieces
   depending on the size bagel you want. A 1 1/2-pound
   recipe yields 8 to 12 finished bagels, each weighing 2
   to 3 ounces, measuring about 4 inches across. Use a
   food scale if you want consistency, or measure with a
   ruler. Cut smaller pieces for mini bagels. Knead in
   added ingredients well before shaping each bagel. You
   can also divide dough and add different ingredients to
   each part so you get a varied batch of bagels from one
   recipe.
   
   CONTINUED IN ABOUT BAGELS -- GENERAL DIRECTIONS 3 B
   
   The Best Bagels are made at home by Dona Z. Meilach
   
   ISBN 1-55867-131-5
   
   Carolyn Shaw April 1996 From: Homenet Cook
  
 
 
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