*  Exported from  MasterCook II  *
 
         Pix Rowe Miller’s Family Fish Chowder - Katherine Hall Pag
 
 Recipe By     : The Body in the Basement - Katherine Hall Page
 Serving Size  : 1    Preparation Time :0:00
 Categories    : Fish & Seafood                   Soups & Stews
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   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
 --------  ------------  --------------------------------
    7      slices        bacon -- 1/4 thick
    3      cups          yellow onion -- diced
    6      medium        potatoes -- peeled
    1      pound         haddock
    1      pound         cod
    2      cans          evaporated milk -- 3 cups
    1      cup           whole milk
                         salt and pepper
 
 Fry the bacon, remove from the pan, and place on a paper towel. Saute the
 onions in the bacon fat and set the pan aside.
 
 Cut the potatoes in half the long way, then into 1/4 slices. Put them in a
 nonreactive pot large enough for the chowder. Cover the potatoes with water
 and boil until tender. Be careful not to put in too much water or hte chowder
 will be soupy. While the potatoes are cooking, cut the fish ointo generous
 bite-sized pieces. When the potatoes are ready, add the fish to the pot, cover
 and simmer until the fish flakes.
 
 When the fish is done, crumble the bacon and add it to the pot along with the
 onionbs and any grease in the pan, the evaporated and whole milks. Bring the
 mixture to a boil, cover, and turn the heat down. Simmer for 5 minutes and add
 salt and pepper to taste.
 
 Chowder invariably tastes better when made a day ahead.
 
 VARIATIONS:
 
 The chowder is still quite delectable with olive oil instead of bacon fat. You
 may also use salt pork. Two kinds of fish make for a more interetsing chowder,
 but these can be any combination of the following: haddock, cod, pollack,
 monkfish, and hake. Finally, there is the question of garnishes: dill, chopped
 parsley, oyster crackers, butter are all good. 
 
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